BEWITCHING THE TRUTH

by Paola Mangia

 

"Bewitching the truth", this is what Edgar Degas used to state whenever he transformed his real world into an artistic shape by translating the occasional datum drawn from reality into the aesthetic dimension of his art. "An act of bewitchment" is what Leonardo Lucchi accomplishes when he manages to block his Bronzes "as if suspended" in the space, entrusting them to a balance that is apparently "natural" and which, time after time, manages to challenge the law of gravity.

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DIALOGUE WITH GOD

by Tommaso Magalotti

 

Among the many themes characterising Leonardo Lucchi's work, there is an "important" tradition that has meant and still means a lot within his complex universe of ideas and sensibility, in his feeling himself as sculptor, artist. That is, a man who – through the manipulation of matter (clay, wax, marble, wood or bronze, it doesn't really matter), is capable of interpreting and conveying a concrete and visible shape to the deep feelings of the human nature.

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THE SCULPTURE OF LEONARDO LUCCHI

by Gustavo Cuccini

 

Contemporary sculptor Leonardo Lucchi rightly inserts himself into the varied panorama of contemporary art after the mid nineteen seventies' growing Transavant-garde sanctioned the overtaking of the Avantgarde dogma intended as pure technical and material experimentation in an optimistic and rectilinear hypothesis of art and of history.
In the last decade of the twentieth century, Lucchi resisted the germ of conceptual art and the temptation of this germ to interrogate himself in order to redefine his own system. But it is also true that in this initial phase of Transavant-garde and Post-industrialism, poetic disparity, which had often led critical investigation on the side of doubt and reconstituted interpretive plans, recomposed itself in the presumed order of the "Esthetic of Recovery."

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LUCCHI: THE ENCHANTMENT OF GOLD

by Silvia Pichi

 

On the occasion of the Biennial Goldsmithery Exhibition held in Florence in 1980, Pier Carlo Santini wondered whether “ modern jewels could possibly exist, jewels expressed by intentionality and properly creative requirements (…), something original, not academic, repetitive or reproducible”. The following Biennial Exhibitions and, especially, a specific branch of the goldsmith activity – that over the last twenty years was mainly brought forth by artists who were also engaged in other expressive forms – gave a new impulse to the goldsmithery, and they smoothed the path for the scenario of the contemporary jewel that currently appears both articulated and complex.

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